More than one way to beat a rhythm
January 31, 2013 — 12:34

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More than one way to beat a rhythm

audio broadcast format

DARLENE TERRY IS BRINGING MORE THAN POW-WOWS AND ANCIENT DANCES TO THE NATIVE AMERICAN CLUB. SHE SAYS,

 

“this is a club where cultures can learn to understand each other…”

AS TERRY SEES IT, TODAY’S COMMUNITIES ARE MORE AND MORE DISJOINTED AND NEED THE INSIGHT NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE CAN OFFER.

 

“The way we’re raised …it takes a whole tribe to raise a child.”

 

THREE NORTHWEST TRIBES ARE REPRESENTED ON CAMPUS, PLUS CHEROKEES AND OTHER ETHNICITIES, BUT WHAT ELSE HAPPENS IN MEETINGS?

“We eat a lot of food…

 

 

YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT HUNTING AND GATHERING IN THE NORTHWEST, CULTURE YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU YEARN FOR,  AND YOU CAN  FIND OUT THERE IS MORE THAN ONE WAY TO BEAT A  RHYTHM.

DEB MCINTOSH REPORTING. THIS IS COUG RADIO.

 

At the edge of my abilities – Thoughts on audio piece one, “More than one way to beat a rhythm”
January 27, 2013 — 16:43

Author: | Category: Someone I met along the way | Tags: , | Comments: 1

At the edge-Reflections on the  production process for my 60-second KOUG radio newsclip.

Clay Shirky said, on page 77 of Cognitive Surplus,

Taking on a job that is too large and complicated can be demoralizing, but taking on a job that is so simple that it presents few challenges can be both dull and demoralizing. The feeling of competence is often best engaged by working right at the edge of one’s abilities.

Is it true? Do we work best when we feel as if we’re ready to fall off the brink?  I’m depending on the next three months of my life to tell me, “Yes”.

Problem 1.

In order to create the 60-second KOUG radio piece for its January 30 deadline, I need to have it completed no later than the evening of January 27. This week, as every week, my job and class schedules are such that I have to complete all my homework assignments during the weekend. When reviewing the meeting times for various campus clubs and activities, hardly any meet then, or would require multiple hours of time I can’t afford to spend engaging in recreational activities.

Problem 2.

I’m dysfunctional at intuitive digital age audio and visual widgets.

Problem 3.

My on-campus social acumen is zero. Worse. It’s pathetic. I’ve been studying at WSU since 2009 and have not yet visited the student center nor the cafeteria. I have excuses, several of them, but they don’t change the facts.

Problem 1 addressed.

I’m fighting my feelings of hopelessness by working on the parts I can do, rather than the parts that seem impossible. If it is already too late for the 60-second clip and I fail to get audio, I can at least try and get points for the reflections (5 points) and for comments on others’ blogs (5 points), and I might even be able to write a script and have at least the voice-over report even if I don’t have an interview (5 points).

Problem 2 addressed.

Page 188-90 of Briggs‘ journalism NEXT explained how to use the audio editing tool, Audacity, in terms I could understand. Then, after learning in class that there is a place called SoundCloud (don’t laugh, there may yet be other ignorants on earth besides me), I opened an account, and read the help files until I learned how to attach  audio files along with their visual widgets into other media, like WordPress. (I got it on the third try)

Problem 3 addressed.

60-second piece. In one of my classes there is a lady who is, I think, active in the non-traditional students association. Through Angel, I probably have her email address.  Maybe I can interview her and maybe she has a friend who can provide the second source.

120-second piece. My Biology LAB ends at the same time and place as class for the high school science students, and they are always milling around their buses on Wednesday at 4:05.

180-second piece. Umm, still working on it.

 

 

 

Just another day in Tigard? Frank Mungeam speaks
January 21, 2013 — 15:06

Author: | Category: Getting Social | Tags: , , | Comments: 1

Just another day in Tigard? Frank Mungeam speaks

Tigard teachers have returned their crates of books for the night, young parents have met up with their spouses for the commute home, and Anne Marie Anderson is setting out the announcement boards cables, and tables for tonight’s event, “Dream It, Do It.”

Storified by Deborah T McIntosh· Mon, Jan 21 2013 14:55:38

Ieimedia
We’re at the Tigard library on a cold January evening, 2013.The speaker is Frank Mungeam, author, guide, media trainer, photographer, and adjunct professor at Washington State University Vancouver, and he’s introducing his new book,  Dream It, Do It: The Road-map to Pursuing Your Passion and Living Your Dreams.
Already on sale at online booksellers, and available as a series of pod casts, Mungeam’s book promises to get you started realizing your special goal in life. In tonight’s meeting, Frank outlines eight precepts for success learned from interviewing high achievers over the course of his 25 year news-gathering career.
Frank Mungeam (frankwords) on TwitterFrank Mungeam. @frankwords. KGW Digital Media, Adjunct prof. at WSU-V, adrenaline junkie, author: 'Dream It, Do It'. Lake Osweg…

Some points compiled from Mungeam’s January 15 presentation:

1. Dare to dream

Tim Leatherman‘s road to success, and more about what you will do “someday”.

Leathermanlibrary
2. Pursue your passion. This is about screenwriter Mike Rich, Olympic gold medalist Beckie Scott,  and the test for you: is your dream  a passion or only an obligation?
Screenwritersutopia
Olympic

3. Face your fears

Here is where you get paralyzed. Once you share your dream, you are committed to pursue it.  Mungeam’s challenge here is, “Are you willing to take risks in order to pursue your passion?” Mungeam’s delineation between supporters and “toxic skeptics” is priceless. He supports the idea that you might succeed in realizing your dream mainly in order to say “nah, nah” to naysayers.

4. Divide and conquer Procrastination is the thief of time and progress is not a straight line. Mungeam outlines how we must apply effort over time in order to realize big goals. He uses Helen Raptis‘ example , and the regimen for those who want to reach Mt Everest’s summit.

 

Katu

5. Schedule your dreams

As Stephan King said in “On Writing“, if you want to accomplish something, you have to give it an honored place in your schedule.

6. Expect setbacks

Mungeam insists that we must see setbacks as opportunities, and that it is what you do when the going gets tough that matters most.

7. Seek coaching and feedback

8. Be persistent

Mungeam quotes Warren Miller. “If you don’t pursue your passions today, you’ll be just be another year older when you do”.

Winterhighland
Well, you get it.
The gist of Mungeam’s new book is, “Achievers just refuse to quit! When the going gets tough, rekindle your passion — and remembers why you’re pursuing this dream.”

Just another day in Tigard? Frank Mungeam speaks
January 20, 2013 — 17:37

Author: | Category: Getting Social | Tags: , , , , | Comments: Off

AnneMarie Anderson

 

Tigard teachers have returned their crates of books for the night, young parents have met up with their spouses for the commute home, and Anne Marie Anderson  is setting out the announcement boards cables, and tables for tonight’s event, “Dream It, Do It.” We’re at the Tigard library on a cold January evening, 2013.The speaker is Frank Mungeam, author, guide, media trainer, photographer, and adjunct professor at Washington State University Vancouver, and he’s introducing his new book,  Dream It, Do It: The Road-map to Pursuing Your Passion and Living Your Dreams.
Already on sale at online booksellers, and available as a series of pod casts, Mungeam’s book promises to get you started realizing your special goal in life. In tonight’s meeting, Frank outlines eight precepts for success learned from interviewing high achievers over the course of his 25 year news-gathering career.

 

 

Here is a shortlist compiled from Mungeam’s January 15 presentation.

1. Dare to dream

Tim Leatherman‘s road to success, and more about what you will do “someday”.

 

Tim Leatherman

 

2. Pursue your passion

Beckie Scott

Mike Rich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About screenwriter Mike Rich, Olympic gold medalist Beckie Scott,  and the test for you: is your dream  a passion or only an obligation?

 

 

 

 

 

3. Face your fears

Here is where you get paralyzed. Once you share your dream, you are committed to pursue it.  Mungeam’s challenge here is, “Are you willing to take risks in order to pursue your passion?” Mungeam’s delineation between supporters and “toxic skeptics” is priceless. He supports the idea that you might succeed in realizing your dream mainly in order to say “nah, nah” to naysayers.

4. Divide and conquer

 

Helen Raptis

Procrastination is the thief of time and progress is not a straight line. Mungeam outlines how we must apply effort over time in order to realize big goals. He uses Helen Raptis‘ example , and the regimen for those who want to reach Mt Everest’s summit.

5. Schedule your dreams

As Stephan King said in “On Writing“, if you want to accomplish something, you have to give it an honored place in your schedule.

6. Expect setbacks

Mungeam insists that we must see setbacks as opportunities, and that it is what you do when the going gets tough that matters most.

7. Seek coaching and feedback

8. Be persistent

 

Mungeam quotes Warren Miller. “If you don’t pursue your passions today, you’ll be just be another year older when you do”.

For more, visit http://frankwords.net/frank_images/index.html

 

Same article, strictly WordPress platform, notable differences.

 

 

Preface to posts on the page, “Someone I met along the way”
January 19, 2013 — 13:00

Author: | Category: Someone I met along the way | Comments: 1

On the first day of his upper level ComJour class,  Dr Brett Oppegaard (@brettoppegaard) asked his journalism students to define journalism. We couldn’t do it. A few years ago we would have done it with ease, but in 2013 we were unable to clearly define what qualifies as journalism today.

We were given the task to find a media object that made us question the definition of journalism, and to post it on our blog.

I looked at newspaper articles and  some magazine articles in print form (stop laughing at me!)  and did not post to my blog. I found a really pathetic obituary in the Oregonian that made it clear the deceased died unloved and uncared for, and I found a Better Homes & Gardens rehash of a rehash about throw rugs that screamed TRITE CLICHE.

Well, too late to repair that error, but I do want to repost here part of a report written by Belinda Alzner of the Canadian Journalism Project, where the CAJ Ethics Committee attempted to address the question, What is Journalism? Here is part of their answer as posted on July 17, 2012

 

What is Journalism?

…we asked ourselves the question: “What is NOT journalism?” Discussing what might distinguish journalism from various other types of work (e.g. activism, social science, memoir, and aggregation), we came up with the suggestion that journalism and journalists might be distinguished from other types of activity and actors under three headings: a disinterested purpose, the act of creation, and a particular set of methods.

It is arguably correct that most journalists ascribe to a largely common set of values, and that various guidelines and codes seek to express and define that ethical heritage. Our proposal declines to do that. Instead, we argue that journalists, and hence journalism, can be recognized and distinguished, not by what they believe or think, but by their actions. These specifically journalistic types of action may be recognized as follows.

1) Purpose: An act of journalism sets out to combine evidence-based research and verification with the creative act of storytelling. Its central purpose is to inform communities about topics or issues that they value.

Journalists draw their own conclusions about the necessity and direction of a story — and of the underlying veracity of facts. Such conclusions are drawn in a disinterested way – that is, independently of consideration of the effect, for good or ill , of the coverage provided. The economic or other benefits to companies, organizations or movements do not drive journalists’ choices. Due to this definitive idea of disinterest, the journalist neither receives nor anticipates a direct benefit, financial or otherwise, from coverage. Any connection or association the journalist, her editor or employer, has with individuals or groups who might benefit from publication of the information is made clear to audiences (although disclosure by itself does not remedy a conflict of interest or, therefore, turn an act of propaganda into an act of journalism). Journalists’ careers, and those of their managers and employers do, at times, benefit indirectly from their coverage choices, but potential benefits, be they direct or indirect, play no role in editorial choices.

2) Creation: All journalistic work — whether words, photography or graphics — contains an element of original production.

Journalism often involves a shared perspective of a team of people whose knowledge and creativity contribute to the final production. Journalism is fact-based; history often shapes the context of a story. In addition, the creative element is bounded by time. A breaking news story may be a single line which, while brief, still involves the skill of news judgment in selecting pertinent facts. Subsequent stories are the result of more in-depth reporting dealing with the investigation of facts and the further organizing of information to give a deeper context to storytelling.

3) Methods: Journalistic work provides clear evidence of a self-conscious discipline calculated to provide an accurate and fair description of facts, opinion and debate at play within a situation.

This notion is not the same idea as “balance” (since a lopsided debate should necessarily be portrayed as lopsided), or as the more complex notion of “objectivity” (see Ward 2010; Schudson, 2001; White, 2010; Brisbane, 2010; Brisbane, 2011). Specifically, the journalist’s craft includes certain recognizable approaches, such as some combination, but not necessarily all, of the following:

  • A commitment to researching and verifying information before publication.
  • A consistent practice of providing rebuttal opportunity for those being criticized, and of presenting alternate perspectives, interpretations and analyses.
  • The use of plain language, and story-telling techniques, as a means to attract a broad rather than an expert audience (Adam, 1993).
  • An honest representation of intent to sources.
  • A practice of conveying the source of facts.
  • A practice of correcting errors.
  • Publication.

Conclusion

Non-journalists will fulfill some of these functional criteria, some of the time. The work of those who do not see themselves as journalists may well be consistent with some of these descriptors. Examples may include some historians, some ethnographers, and independent commentators of various kinds. Works that come close to meeting the criteria could include a book review, a carefully crafted and considered letter to the editor, or a thorough, thoughtful comment on a piece of news by someone without any interest in the matter beyond intellectual.

But we propose that for most purposes, the above three criteria create a three-way definitional “veto”. That is, all three criteria must be met in order for an act to qualify as journalism. Failure to pass any one of these tests means that the act in question is not journalism, and only journalists will meet — or, at least, attempt to meet — all these criteria consistently, fully and deliberately.

Student opinion on university tuition hikes
January 19, 2013 — 10:37

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What Nick Sanchez and Lee Sehr said about tuition increases might surprise you.

WSUV students on tuition hikes

Someone I met along the way
January 16, 2013 — 22:54

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It’s January, 2013. We have freezing fog during the nights and days so cloudy it looks like early evening all day. For this final semester of my undergraduate studies , my head is full of disjointed information half-learned and little practiced.

This  drear Northwest winter  I’m posting on people I meet along the way.